With Rasp in Hand

eileenxdover:

Today is the last day of July and I have successfully gone without meat for a whole month. So, will I be racing out to the supermarket tomorrow to buy a kilo of bacon? Probably not. Why? Because believe it or not, I don’t really miss meat anymore. I’ve gotten so used to skipping past the meat…

Awesome awesome awesome.

fuglyhorses:


About Maturity and Growth Plates By Dr. Deb Bennett
Owners and trainers need to realize there’s a definite, easy-to-remember schedule of bone fusion. Make a decision when to ride the horse based on that rather than on the external appearance of the horse. For there are some breeds of horse—the Quarter Horse is the premier among these—which have been bred in such a manner as to LOOK mature LONG before they actually ARE. This puts these horses in jeopardy from people who are either ignorant of the closure schedule, or more interested in their own schedule (racing, jumping, futurities or other competitions) than they are in the welfare of the animal. The process of fusion goes from the bottom up. In other words, the lower down toward the hooves, the earlier the growth plates will fuse—the higher up toward the animal’s back you look, the later. The growth plate at the top of the coffin bone, in the hoof, is fused at birth. What this means is that the coffin bones get no TALLER after birth (they get much larger around, though, by another mechanism). That’s the first one. In order after that: 2. Short pastern - top & bottom between birth and 6 mos. 3. Long pastern - top & bottom between 6 mos. and 1 yr. 4. Cannon bone - top & bottom between 8 mos. and 1.5 yrs. 5. Small bones of knee - top & bottom on each, between 1.5 and 2.5 yrs. 6. Bottom of radius-ulna - between 2 and 2.5 yrs. 7. Weight-bearing portion of glenoid notch at top of radius - between 2.5 and 3 yrs. 8. Humerus - top & bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs. 9. Scapula - glenoid or bottom (weight-bearing) portion - between 3.5 and 4 yrs. 10. Hindlimb - lower portions same as forelimb 11. HOCK - this joint is “late” for as low down as it is; growth plates on the tibial & fibular tarsals don’t fuse until the animal is 4 yrs old! So the hocks are a known a “weak point”. Even the 18th-century literature warns against driving young horses in plow or other deep or sticky footing, or jumping them up into a heavy load, for danger of spraining their hocks. 12. Tibia - top & bottom, between 2.5 and 3 yrs. 13. Femur - bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.; neck, between 3.5 and 4 yrs.; major and 3rd trochanters, between 3 and 3.5 yrs. 14. Pelvis - growth plates on the points of hip, peak of croup (tubera sacrale), and points of buttock (tuber ischii), between 3 and 4 yrs. And what do you think is last? The vertebral column (spine) of course. A normal horse has 32 vertebrae between the back of the skull and the root of the dock, and there are several growth plates on each one, the most important of which is the one capping the centrum. The spine does not fuse until the horse is at least 5-1/2 years old. This figure applies to all horses, small scrubby, range raised horses to huge Warm Bloods. The taller your horse and the longer its neck, the later full fusion occurs. For a male (is this a surprise?) you add six months. So, for example, a 17-hand TB or Saddlebred or WB gelding may not be fully mature until his 8th year. Something that owners of such individuals have often told me that they “suspected.” The lateness of vertebral “closure” is most significant for two reasons. One: in no limb are there 32 growth plates! Two: The growth plates in the limbs are (more or less) oriented perpendicular (up and down) to the stress of the load passing through them, while those of the vertebral chain are oriented parallel (horizontal) to weight placed upon the horse’s back. Bottom line: you can sprain a horse’s back (i.e., displace the vertebral growth plates) a lot more easily than you can sprain those located in the limbs. And here’s another little fact: within the chain of vertebrae, the last to fully “close” are those at the base of the animal’s neck—that’s why the long-necked individual may go past 6 yrs. to achieve full maturity. So you also have to be careful—very careful—not to yank the neck around on your young horse, or get him in any situation where he strains his neck.”
Submitted by laughterbynight (sorry about the image quality. This is the clearest version I could find.)

This is great information, thank you!

fuglyhorses:

About Maturity and Growth Plates
By Dr. Deb Bennett

Owners and trainers need to realize there’s a definite, easy-to-remember schedule of bone fusion. Make a decision when to ride the horse based on that rather than on the external appearance of the horse.
For there are some breeds of horse—the Quarter Horse is the premier among these—which have been bred in such a manner as to LOOK mature LONG before they actually ARE. This puts these horses in jeopardy from people who are either ignorant of the closure schedule, or more interested in their own schedule (racing, jumping, futurities or other competitions) than they are in the welfare of the animal.
The process of fusion goes from the bottom up. In other words, the lower down toward the hooves, the earlier the growth plates will fuse—the higher up toward the animal’s back you look, the later. The growth plate at the top of the coffin bone, in the hoof, is fused at birth. What this means is that the coffin bones get no TALLER after birth (they get much larger around, though, by another mechanism). That’s the first one. In order after that:
2. Short pastern - top & bottom between birth and 6 mos.
3. Long pastern - top & bottom between 6 mos. and 1 yr.
4. Cannon bone - top & bottom between 8 mos. and 1.5 yrs.
5. Small bones of knee - top & bottom on each, between 1.5 and 2.5 yrs.
6. Bottom of radius-ulna - between 2 and 2.5 yrs.
7. Weight-bearing portion of glenoid notch at top of radius - between 2.5 and 3 yrs.
8. Humerus - top & bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.
9. Scapula - glenoid or bottom (weight-bearing) portion - between 3.5 and 4 yrs.
10. Hindlimb - lower portions same as forelimb
11. HOCK - this joint is “late” for as low down as it is; growth plates on the tibial & fibular tarsals don’t fuse until the animal is 4 yrs old! So
the hocks are a known a “weak point”. Even the 18th-century literature warns against driving young horses in plow or other deep or sticky footing, or jumping them up into a heavy load, for danger of spraining their hocks.
12. Tibia - top & bottom, between 2.5 and 3 yrs.
13. Femur - bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.; neck, between 3.5 and 4 yrs.; major and 3rd trochanters, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.
14. Pelvis - growth plates on the points of hip, peak of croup (tubera sacrale), and points of buttock (tuber ischii), between 3 and 4 yrs.
And what do you think is last? The vertebral column (spine) of course. A normal horse has 32 vertebrae between the back of the skull and the root of the dock, and there are several growth plates on each one, the most important of which is the one capping the centrum.
The spine does not fuse until the horse is at least 5-1/2 years old. This figure applies to all horses, small scrubby, range raised horses to huge Warm Bloods. The taller your horse and the longer its neck, the later full fusion occurs. For a male (is this a surprise?) you add six months. So, for example, a 17-hand TB or Saddlebred or WB gelding may not be fully mature until his 8th year. Something that owners of such individuals have often told me that they “suspected.”
The lateness of vertebral “closure” is most significant for two reasons.
One: in no limb are there 32 growth plates!
Two: The growth plates in the limbs are (more or less) oriented perpendicular (up and down) to the stress of the load passing through them, while those of the vertebral chain are oriented parallel (horizontal) to weight placed upon the horse’s back.
Bottom line: you can sprain a horse’s back (i.e., displace the vertebral growth plates) a lot more easily than you can sprain those located in the limbs.
And here’s another little fact: within the chain of vertebrae, the last to fully “close” are those at the base of the animal’s neck—that’s why the long-necked individual may go past 6 yrs. to achieve full maturity. So you also have to be careful—very careful—not to yank the neck around on your young horse, or get him in any situation where he strains his neck.”

Submitted by laughterbynight (sorry about the image quality. This is the clearest version I could find.)

This is great information, thank you!

eileenxdover:

image

If you’ve been to the supermarket lately, you may have seen pork products with “bred free range” on the label. I’m sorry to be the one to break it to you, but “bred free range” does not mean the animal has spent it’s whole life frolicking in a big grassy paddock..

Bred free range means that…

thehorselifestyle:

Credit


EXCUSE ME MISS is that a carrot for me?

thehorselifestyle:

Credit

EXCUSE ME MISS is that a carrot for me?

acr-photography:

Devon 2014

What a LOVELY horse!

acr-photography:

Devon 2014

What a LOVELY horse!

Some owners believe their particular horse, or perhaps some breeds of horses, are intolerant of being barefoot. No doubt, these people have had experiences with horses that get sore feet or whose feet deteriorate whenever they are allowed to go barefoot. What is likely the case here is that these owners are seeing horses whose feet are weak, chip easily, are always bruised and lame because they have a history of having been shod, improperly trimmed for a long time, or disallowed adequate movement on appropriate terrain from the day they were born. It isn’t being barefoot that these horses are intolerant of–rather it is an intolerance to being shod, improperly trimmed and/or inappropriately managed. The further claim that the “horses have had the hooves bred right off of them” is also an excuse that certain ones need steel shoes to do their “jobs”…in actuality, it is the mismanagement of horses from the moment of their birth, and even before birth, that sentences them to a life of mediocre hoof and leg quality.
Dr. Thomas Teskey (via barefoothooves)

YES

collegehumor:

Watch "Orange is the New Black" star Matt McGorry’s Leaked "Magic Mike 2" Audition
Gross gross gross

Gross gross gross

cutebabe:

shipcomingthrough:

Just watch it.

oh……my fucking

WHY ARE WE NOT FUNDING THIS?!?!

barefoothooves:

heartofhorselords:

barefoothooves:

heartofhorselords:

barefoothooves:

heartofhorselords:

Regarding hooves:

Another thing that I forgot to mention is that, when a hoof is not properly trimmed and the laminae start to stretch — especially when the hoof is also shod and thus mechanism/blood flow is inhibited even more — is that we often start to see necrosis of the laminae. Basically,…

Technically the bone doesn’t go anywhere though. It’s a failure of the capsule. But yes, P3 can “rotate” or “sink” or both.

o rly

-chinhands-

whisper to me, sweet words of malfunctioning capsules

I have copies of some pictures of a very a serious hoof capsule failure due to a vet prescribed tetonomy and terrible trimming, but they are absolutely horrid and very scary. I hesitate to post them. But maybe. The horse is alive and is now ridden regularly thanks to a great trimmer, but it was real bad.

maybe under a read-more? or email them lol — I would LOVE to see them!

So long as no one gets pissed at me I’ll post them in just a few. I’m going to tag them “graphic” and “gore” for anyone who doesn’t want to see them. I guess they aren’t much worse than a fresh cadaver, but they a quite startling… Also fair warning people on mobile that don’t always get the “read more”…..

Stabilize, remove the insult, facilitate healing.