With Rasp in Hand

OMFG crying tears of joy over here…

edwardspoonhands:

frozen-fractals-all-around:

a-different-kind-of-royalty:

If you think about it Ursula was actually really nice because she only promised Ariel legs, and she gave her really nice legs that matched her body type and skin color when she could have just as easily given her goat legs

image

Or she could have given her eight legs.

edwardspoonhands:

This is not what you might expect. Andrew W.K is freaking awesome.

unhappyhorses:

heartofhorselords:

Several weeks ago, I was reading my USPC C1/C2 manual and I started a chapter I’d never bothered to look at before. It’s in the second edition (which was released in 2013; not even two years ago!), paperback, on page 281, chapter 10, “Ground Training: Handling, Leading, and Longing.” I’d never bothered to look at it because I’d never needed it; by the time I’d joined Pony Club, my horse already had ground manners, knew how to lead, and I was already learning how to longe from my Classical teacher (which I have problems with, too, but less problems than I do with how I’ve seen USPC teaching/practice longing.) At that point, I already knew how USPC taught and executed longing in a manner that was extremely incorrect, so the entire chapter was just something I never looked at.
What caught my eye was the sub-heading “How Horses Learn,” which got me really excited, y’know? I like Learning Theory, and them talking about how horses learn is right up my alley, right?!
Wrong.
The very first sentence under the heading, as you can see, is “To train a horse, you use reinforcement, or rewards and corrections.” It then goes on to further define just what those things are:
“Rewards encourage the horse to repeat the behavior. Rewards can be food, patting, kind words, release of pressure, or best of all, a break from work.”
“Correction means anything that discourages a specific behavior. Correction does not always mean punishment. It can be a word such as “No” or Quit”; a sharp, disapproving voice; making the horse stop and wait; or making him do something over again. Think of correction as correcting a horse’s mistake or showing him what he should do, rather than punishing him.”
My reaction then still stands. I’m sorry. What?WHAT?
This description of ‘reinforcement’ doesn’t make any sense from a Learning Theory perspective when a) it’s already been established (for the time being; we’ll see what the future brings) that all living beings capable of learned behavior learn the same way and b) while it uses some of the terms, it completely misrepresents what Learning Theory and the four quadrants actually mean/describe, particularly when they’re using (misapplying) concepts pulled directly from Learning Theory.
Behaviorist Learning Theory’s Reinforcement is this definition’s ‘reward.’ Reinforcement by Behaviorist definition cannot involve corrections/the reduction of behavior. Reinforcement, to the Scientifically literate, if the increasing the likelihood of a behavior happening again. Their definition of correction is literally what Punishment means: the decreasing the likelihood of a behavior happening again — which is laughable, really, when you backtrack and re-read that they’ve literally written, verbatim: “Correction does not always mean punishment.”
What this tells me (well, confirms for me,) is that USPC has no clue what they’re talking about regarding equine behavior, how horses learning, and how to train according to how horses learn. It also drives into home that — what with how massive an organization USPC is and how many children are learning from this book — how ass-backwards the horse world is about animal behaviorism and training. 
And it’s frustrating. Equitation Science requires a scientific framework to define terms, not a colloquial definition, not a connotative definition. It’s definitely important to be able to lay out science to the lay-man (don’t get me started on academic elitism and the couching of information though inaccessible language), but it’s also important to have a degree of scientific literacy to know what you’re looking at. I love Pony Club for a lot of reasons, but they fall short in so many things, and teaching scientific literacy is one of them.
It almost doesn’t bear saying, but I’ll say it anyways: be critical of every bit of media you consume.

See, this is the kind of thing that’s so frustrating and disturbing about the horse world. These people are surrounded by horses, every day, have likely grown up with horses, spend a great deal of time around them, and yet they have no real knowledge about how training works. They don’t have the knowledge, and they don’t have the vocab.
The four quadrants (negative reinforcement, positive reinforcement, negative punishment, and positive punishment) are the basics that everyone should know before they work with animals, let alone attempt to write a manual for such a vast audience. This kind of knowledge needs to be commonplace.

I think this highlights how forgiving and adaptable horses really are.

unhappyhorses:

heartofhorselords:

Several weeks ago, I was reading my USPC C1/C2 manual and I started a chapter I’d never bothered to look at before. It’s in the second edition (which was released in 2013; not even two years ago!), paperback, on page 281, chapter 10, “Ground Training: Handling, Leading, and Longing.” I’d never bothered to look at it because I’d never needed it; by the time I’d joined Pony Club, my horse already had ground manners, knew how to lead, and I was already learning how to longe from my Classical teacher (which I have problems with, too, but less problems than I do with how I’ve seen USPC teaching/practice longing.) At that point, I already knew how USPC taught and executed longing in a manner that was extremely incorrect, so the entire chapter was just something I never looked at.

What caught my eye was the sub-heading “How Horses Learn,” which got me really excited, y’know? I like Learning Theory, and them talking about how horses learn is right up my alley, right?!

Wrong.

The very first sentence under the heading, as you can see, is “To train a horse, you use reinforcement, or rewards and corrections.” It then goes on to further define just what those things are:

  • Rewards encourage the horse to repeat the behavior. Rewards can be food, patting, kind words, release of pressure, or best of all, a break from work.”
  • Correction means anything that discourages a specific behavior. Correction does not always mean punishment. It can be a word such as “No” or Quit”; a sharp, disapproving voice; making the horse stop and wait; or making him do something over again. Think of correction as correcting a horse’s mistake or showing him what he should do, rather than punishing him.”

My reaction then still stands.

I’m sorry.
What?
WHAT?

This description of ‘reinforcement’ doesn’t make any sense from a Learning Theory perspective when a) it’s already been established (for the time being; we’ll see what the future brings) that all living beings capable of learned behavior learn the same way and b) while it uses some of the terms, it completely misrepresents what Learning Theory and the four quadrants actually mean/describe, particularly when they’re using (misapplying) concepts pulled directly from Learning Theory.

Behaviorist Learning Theory’s Reinforcement is this definition’s ‘reward.’ Reinforcement by Behaviorist definition cannot involve corrections/the reduction of behavior. Reinforcement, to the Scientifically literate, if the increasing the likelihood of a behavior happening again. Their definition of correction is literally what Punishment means: the decreasing the likelihood of a behavior happening again — which is laughable, really, when you backtrack and re-read that they’ve literally written, verbatim: “Correction does not always mean punishment.”

What this tells me (well, confirms for me,) is that USPC has no clue what they’re talking about regarding equine behavior, how horses learning, and how to train according to how horses learn. It also drives into home that — what with how massive an organization USPC is and how many children are learning from this book — how ass-backwards the horse world is about animal behaviorism and training.

And it’s frustrating. Equitation Science requires a scientific framework to define terms, not a colloquial definition, not a connotative definition. It’s definitely important to be able to lay out science to the lay-man (don’t get me started on academic elitism and the couching of information though inaccessible language), but it’s also important to have a degree of scientific literacy to know what you’re looking at. I love Pony Club for a lot of reasons, but they fall short in so many things, and teaching scientific literacy is one of them.

It almost doesn’t bear saying, but I’ll say it anyways: be critical of every bit of media you consume.

See, this is the kind of thing that’s so frustrating and disturbing about the horse world. These people are surrounded by horses, every day, have likely grown up with horses, spend a great deal of time around them, and yet they have no real knowledge about how training works. They don’t have the knowledge, and they don’t have the vocab.

The four quadrants (negative reinforcement, positive reinforcement, negative punishment, and positive punishment) are the basics that everyone should know before they work with animals, let alone attempt to write a manual for such a vast audience. This kind of knowledge needs to be commonplace.

I think this highlights how forgiving and adaptable horses really are.

bitchesinbreeches:

militiamedic:

bootyisagirlsbestfriend:

"go the fuck away im not dealing w ur snake shit today"

… he just slapped a fucking cobra.


Am I the only one that feels bad for the poor snake?

No, I do too. I wonder if he killed it?

bitchesinbreeches:

militiamedic:

bootyisagirlsbestfriend:

"go the fuck away im not dealing w ur snake shit today"

… he just slapped a fucking cobra.

Am I the only one that feels bad for the poor snake?

No, I do too. I wonder if he killed it?

Our friend the OTTB that had shoes off last weekend isn’t doing too well. He had temporary relief when the shoes came off but isn’t handling the footing at all and can’t relax which is only making him more sore. Went back today to fit some RX Therapy boots with pads and he immediately stood with his front legs perpendicular to the ground (as they should!) and was finally able to rest a hind leg. With boots he was striding out and seemed much more confident (but still so body sore).

Owner is putting him on MgCl next week. I’m hoping to see some improvement for this poor horse soon.

leela-summers:

Australians on Tumblr are the best

Part 2: x
Part 3: x

leela-summers:

Australians on Tumblr Part 3

Part 1: x
Part 2: x

leinovablog:

lady-top-hat:

sigmund-floyd:

Without lifting the pencil from the paper.

Holy shit

woww

the-lime-equine:

Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show. 8.2.14.


Clubfoot guys.

the-lime-equine:

Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show. 8.2.14.

Clubfoot guys.